On the genealogy of morals and ecce homo nietzsche friedrich kaufmann walter. On the Genealogy of Morals and Ecce Homo 2019-02-22

On the genealogy of morals and ecce homo nietzsche friedrich kaufmann walter Rating: 6,7/10 583 reviews

On the Genealogy of Morality

on the genealogy of morals and ecce homo nietzsche friedrich kaufmann walter

The second inquiry deals with guilt and the bad conscience; the third with ascetic ideals—not only in religion but also in the academy. Man is naturally cruel, he argues. The world perhaps has been dark, but this anger will be the lightening rod which shakes away the shells of our complacent irreverence toward truth and nature! Kaufmann leaves the phrase untranslated, as he ought, and lets a note do the work of translating it. What is thus now required, Nietzsche concludes, is a critique of the value of truth itself §24. It contains chapters on all the books he himself published. Comprised of a preface and three essays, the book argues against a fixed set of moral values and specifically against Christian morality by tracing the development and evolution of moralistic thinking, as Nietzsche views it. He was also vehemently opposed to anti-Semitism.

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On the Genealogy of Morals and Ecce Homo by Friedrich Nietzsche

on the genealogy of morals and ecce homo nietzsche friedrich kaufmann walter

Thus the sickness of guilt. Nothing Nietzsche wrote is more stunning stylistically or as a human document. Nietzsche references the work of Schopenhauer, his great teacher, who he believes has made possible a new Buddhism for Europeans - nihilism. But Nietzsche takes me back. I read Zarathustra in high school and I remember connecting so deeply to his dissatisfaction with religion. If you are too weak to control what happens in your life, how can you possibly predict the future enough to enter into a long-term agreement? The way I read tends to wear down bindings, but this one had no trouble.

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On the Genealogy of Morals and Ecce Homo by Friedrich Nietzsche, Walter Kaufmann (9780679724629)

on the genealogy of morals and ecce homo nietzsche friedrich kaufmann walter

In the proceeding section of the treatise, Nietzsche discusses civilization's taming of man the animal. Very unlikely considering that the Romans tortured and murdered people as public entertainment for centuries, and no one batted an eye. It's a bit of a laugh riot from some angles but one that includes a series of doubtful and perplexed moments about from where or why the laughter comes. Walter Kaufmann's masterful translations are faithful of the word and spirit of Nietzsche, and his running footnote commentaries on both books are more comprehensive than those in his other Nietzsche translations because these tow works have been so widely misunderstood. The ascetic priest offers a palliative to suffering through the neutralization of our affects and senses to the point of absolute indifference, and the sublimation of our consciousness to mechanical repetition in works and rituals. But they have no right to make the bird of prey accountable for being a bird of prey.

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On the Genealogy of Morals / Ecce Homo by Friedrich Nietzsche

on the genealogy of morals and ecce homo nietzsche friedrich kaufmann walter

It contains chapters on all the books he himself published. It's a bad combination, answers don't suffice and it's said that thought should stand on faith. Nietzsche is an angry mother telling her son that he has no future at all because he only drinks himself to death in a bar every night. There are many others who have done a more critical review of it than I can provide. He makes a connection between the creations of words and places them within the historical context of rulers and nobility. He rarely ends a passage on a bad note.

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On the Genealogy of Morals and Ecce Homo by Friedrich Nietzsche, Walter Kaufmann (9780679724629)

on the genealogy of morals and ecce homo nietzsche friedrich kaufmann walter

Smith's would get five stars if I reviewed it. This is a quite specific mischief, and it is settled throughout Ecce Homo. Translator and educator Walter Kaufmann successfully creates a volume that is greater than the sum of its parts here: the combination of On the Genealogy of Morals and Ecce Homo is a radical learning experience that every reader, not just philosophy students, should try. Some of the contents and many symbols and metaphors portrayed in On the Genealogy of Morality, together with its tripartite structure, seem to be based on and influenced by 's On the History of Religion and Philosophy in Germany. Walter Kaufmann's masterful translations are faithful of the word and spirit of Nietzsche, and his running footnote commentaries on both books are more comprehensive than those in his other Nietzsche translations because these tow works have been so widely misunderstood. But during and at the end of this process, in order to justify one's existence despite his sickness, the sick man tells others that the pain in his mouth is actually a great joy to have and teeth are bad anyway. So, with this in mind, you are sure to find answers in the divine human that is yourself, before you find them in the Nietzsche whom so many so desperately and despondently seek.

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On the Genealogy of Morals

on the genealogy of morals and ecce homo nietzsche friedrich kaufmann walter

But it suffers in one important way, and that is how it conflates Hegel's idealism and Nietzsche's thought through the use of a Hegelian, idealist vocabulary. If he asks the question of the ideal it is only to recall all that it cost to humanity during the history and to refute it en bloc. The priests, and all those who feel disenfranchised and powerless in a situation of subjugation and physical impotence e. He discusses the historical tossings and turnings that have led to weird inversions of moral standards throughout the ages. On the Genealogy of Morals 1887 shows him using philsophy, psychology, and classical philology in an effort to give new direction to an ancient discipline. Instead of worshipping a God, they worship truth! The first read was for comprehension.

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On the Genealogy of Morals and Ecce Homo by Friedrich Nietzsche

on the genealogy of morals and ecce homo nietzsche friedrich kaufmann walter

The philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche was born in Prussia in 1844. Nietzsche insists that Europe's taming of man is a tremendous danger, for we are made to be weary of our own being. Also, did you know that there's a brand of bread called Ecce Panis? The better path is the one Nietzsche opened up here: in-depth research into the historical evolution of morality as culture. Because there are two works here, I will review them each separately. It laid the groundwork for such 20th century thinkers as Foucault and Deleuze, though they would never reach Nietzsche's complexity and moral sophistication. I think I have a decent understanding of both works, or at least as good of an understanding as anyone can achieve with the enigma that is Friedrich Nietzsche.

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On the Genealogy of Morals and Ecce Homo

on the genealogy of morals and ecce homo nietzsche friedrich kaufmann walter

There's some, but not much, moral knowledge on the path they're following. The second essay in the polemic On the Geneology of Morals is excellent and my personal favorite of the three essays that comprise this work. This translation of two of Nietzsche's important works includes commentary by Walter Kaufman. They enlightened me in a world-historical context. In the proceeding section of the treatise, Nietzsche discusses civilization's taming of man the animal. Behinds Webber, Plato also has similar things to say as Nietzsche. Ecce Homo, written in 1898 and first published posthumously in 1908, is Nietzsche's review of his life and works.

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